Photography is not always an expensive hobby

6 06 2007

21Y8NB0JM1L._AA_SL160_.jpgYes, photography can be an expensive hobby, as my friend Stephane says:

Browsing a BBC Wildlife Photographer of The Year book while shopping for a telephoto lens is a frustrative experience. The young wildlife photographers 11-14 year old are using a $3,500 camera body with a $3,500 lens. I’m wondering what kind of equipment the parents of these kids are carrying around.

But you can also follow Ken Rockwell’s advice and get yourself a Nikon D40, about which Ken writes:

My D40 is too much fun. I own all sorts of serious cameras like the Canon 5D, Nikon D200, D80 and D70, but my D40, with its weightless 18-55mm lens and SB-400 flash, is what I grab most of the time as of May 2007 when I just want to make good photos easily.

Granted, you won’t be able to take that shot of a lion lying far away in the savannah with a 18-55 (not without risking being eaten, at least), but considering that you can get a D40 online for as little as €520 in Europe(or $536.95 on Amazon.com if you are in the US), there’s a lot of pictures you can make before you feel the need for that $3,500 body and $3,500 lens.

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2 responses

7 06 2007
Odi

I wholeheartedly agree. Even though I am not a professional photographer, I just love my D40. And for the lion check out the 55-200mm VR lens! It’s very light as well (plastic).

7 06 2007
Bill Webb

A photography instructor I had more years ago than I want to remember used to say,”It ain’t the camera, it’s the nut holding it to your forehead.”

Just about any digital camera on the market has the ability to take wonderful photos under the right circumstances. It’s when we exceed the ability of our present camera on a frequent basis that we need more expensive equipment. Technical performance comes from the equipment. Photography comes from the photographer, and all the equipment at National Camera won’t turn a beginner into an expert. That takes training and looking at lots of photos — your own, and others, with a verrrry critical eye. Period.

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